The world according to me

I have a lot of opinions. And yes, not everyone wants to hear them – in which case you have the option of avoiding this category entirely. However I did need a place to post my thoughts about the world and all the amazing craziness in it.

Doctor Sherlock and Danny Watson?

Buzz about the new Doctor Who series is swirling around the internet. The fandom is divided – as usual – but I think the general consensus is positive which is lovely. For myself, I am thoroughly enjoying getting to know this new Doctor. Peter Capaldi is brilliant and Jenna Coleman is now being given a real chance to shine.

Something has really piqued my interest though. I’ve found myself contemplating the Doctor’s characterisation more closely than usual. I’m particularly interested in trying to predict the dynamic between the Doctor and his yet-to-be, kind-of-companion, Danny Pink. The conclusion that I’ve come to (and am slightly concerned by) is that the Doctor might be becoming Sherlock. And could Danny be Dr John Watson?

It started with this line:

“Top layer, if you want to say a few words.”

At the time I laughed and reveled in the delicious darkness of that line. Later I thought, “Oh, shit. Sherlock just spoke out of the Doctor’s mouth!”

A lack of empathy largely defines Sherlock’s character. He is described as a high functioning sociopath and while the Doctor is thankfully still reaching out to people for connection in his grumpy kind of way, one could argue that his dialogue at least is sounding rather devoid of empathy. In fact, his dialogue is sounding extremely Sherlock. It doesn’t take much effort to imagine Benedict Cumberbatch delivering the above line in his droll, uniquely resonating voice. Similarly, I can hear his voice in this:

“Yeah, my carer. She cares so I don’t have to.”

But moving on.

There’s been a fair bit of talk about the Doctor suddenly having a disdain for soldiers. At first I didn’t want to think about it but eventually I had to admit that this doesn’t seem to make much sense. The Doctor has had many close dealings with U.N.I.T. Clearly the Doctor has never thought much of the way soldiers choose to deal with things but he’s never displayed any specific distaste for them that I can recall. If anything, he’s been more chiding. Perhaps it might be argued that this Doctor’s more bristly personality means that he is now happy to be open about his disdain. I’m not sure that I’m sold on that though.

This brings us to Danny Watson, I mean – Pink.

“I just wish you hadn’t been a soldier.”

Journey Blue was denied companion-status and the only reason this scene was written is because it sets up the relationship between the Doctor and Danny, a former soldier.

It stands to reason that Danny’s relationship with the Doctor might help him come to terms with his killing of a civilian. I expect we might see antagonism and bonding over this shared experience. One tick for character development.

But what might make Danny want to travel with the Doctor in the first place?

Danny is a soldier-turned-teacher and perhaps he simply wants to learn more about his love interest, Clara. But might we see a, “You’re not haunted by the war, Dr. Watson. You miss it,” moment? I don’t think that Danny will necessarily miss war. But I do wonder if travelling with the Doctor will reveal Danny’s need for excitement and danger in the same way that Dr Watson needs these things in his life.

In conclusion?

Well, I don’t know. I love Doctor Who. I’ll follow the journey wherever it takes me. Some things I’ll love. Other things I won’t.

Writing is hard. Writing for a successful show like Doctor Who must come with a lot of pressure. Writing for Doctor Who and Sherlock sounds… well, super hard. So I wonder whether it was inevitable that one show might bleed into the other.

 

Nooooope!

I used to be really open to all kinds of theories. Even when things sounded far-fetched I still perched on the fence, not willing to rule out any possibility. At some point though, I allowed myself to really notice what my instincts were telling me. And far more often than not they were saying, “Nooooope!”

People can and do have their own beliefs. That’s perfectly fine in many circumstances but make no mistake. These are beliefs. Far too often I see arguments formulated upon false premises. Whether it is the anti-vaxxer movement, climate change deniers, alien conspiracy theories or Facebook hoaxes, all to often the arguments for their validity are based on an incorrect proposition. Take the anti-vaxxers for example. Many of their arguments are based on the idea that vaccines cause more diseases than they prevent. That simply isn’t true and the result is that we are now seeing the return of preventable diseases. Another example can clearly be seen in the quote and screenshot from the Ancient Aliens series that I have posted below.

PumaPunkuDebunked

Generally I don’t care if people’s beliefs are harmless. What does get me angry is the spread of any misinformation that causes far-reaching adverse effects such as climate change denial or incorrect claims about vaccination. I’m also not partial to being treated as though I’m naive or ignorant simply because I don’t believe there is any merit to your particular ideology. But I’m not going to bother arguing the point with any individual if I can avoid it – because people will almost always remain unmoved in the face of evidence when it challenges their belief system. Religion is proof enough of that.

The Name of the Doctor

*** SPOILER ALERT: Do not read if you haven’t yet watched the Series 7 Doctor Who finale ***

The internet has exploded. Since last night series finale, The Name of the Doctor, Doctor Who pages have gone into meltdown. This does not surprise me. What surprises me is:

(a)  how many people were confused by the storyline
(b)  how many people over-think it and come up with crazy theories
(c)  how many people refuse to let go of theories that have been explained away

So this is my two cents on various topics. I’d apologise in advance to non-Whovians, but there is clearly something wrong with you. Come back when you’ve watched Blink ;)

Number of Regenerations

In the classic episode The Deadly Assassin, it is stated that a Time Lord can regenerate twelve times. Yet there have been contradictions, exceptions and loopholes, one of which being that Time Lords can be offered a new cycle of regenerations (The Five Doctors). It is not even necessary to weigh up the evidence really. What people tend to forget is that the show has had different writers who deal with things in different ways. In the Sarah Jane adventures, Russell T Davis deliberately included dialogue where the Eleventh Doctor stated he could regenerate 507 times. If you read his book A Writer’s Tale, he explains that he did this for a laugh at the fandom because they seem to forget that canon has and always will contradict itself. He found it amusing that the fandom seem to cling to some canon while dismissing others. The fact of the matter is, if the BBC want to continue the show beyond thirteen regenerations, they will.

The Secret of the Doctor

The big reveal last night was the secret of the Doctor. The secret was not his name as expected. Only River still knows that (and maybe Clara who had begun to remember events that occurred in Journey to the Centre of the TARDIS). The secret was the existence of another of the Doctor’s regenerations, played by by legendary actor John Hurt. When Clara is confused that she has only seen the eleven faces of the Doctor, the Eleventh Doctor says, “I said he was me. I didn’t say he was the Doctor. My real name… that is not the point. The name I chose was the Doctor. It’s like a promise you make. He’s the one who broke the promise.” More on that later.

Not the Valeyard

One theory is that this Doctor (who I shall call Doctor Hurt for sake of ease) is the Valeyard. No. I mean, I’m happy to be proven wrong but – no. The Valeyard is hardly a secret that the Doctor would want to keep hidden at all cost. Every classic fan knows of his existence. The Time Lords knew of his existence. Further, the Great Intelligence says, “The Doctor will have other names before his life is through, ‘the Beast… the Valeyard'”. While the Great Intelligence may or may not yet know about the existence of Doctor Hurt, he certainly knows about the Valeyard. So again, not a secret.

While it could be argued that the Nu-Who characters (with the exception of the Great Intelligence) would not know of the Valeyard, the Valeyard is hardly a game changer for Doctor Who – and Moffat specifically said that The Name of the Doctor would change the show forever.

Doctor Zero

It has been theorised that Doctor Hurt is the Doctor prior to William Hartnell’s Doctor. Again, no. The Eleventh Doctor’s words, “He’s the one who broke the promise” proves that there was a promise to break, i.e. that Doctor Hurt came after the Doctor chose his name. End of story.

A Future Incarnation

There are a lot of people out there who think Doctor Hurt is the 12th Doctor, or at the very least, a future incarnation of the Doctor. While it can be argued that the Doctor may now know his entire future since stepping into his own timeline, Eleven specifically said, “He is my secret”. He wasn’t surprised. He wasn’t shocked. Eleven knew about this incarnation before he stepped into his own timeline.

The Other

People have been theorising for a long time that the Doctor is the  third mysterious person who along with Rassilon and Omega created Time Lord society. While this may be true (and I like to think it is) the idea that Doctor Hurt is the “Other” is not very likely. The Other has never been referred to onscreen directly. Most viewers will not even be aware of this vague and obscure possibility in Doctor Who canon. As such, using the Other as a “big reveal” will have little or no emotional impact for viewers… and that makes bad television. Furthermore, if the Doctor was the third person, this would likely have been during his first incarnation and the logic therefore falls down in the face of my “Doctor Zero” arguments above.

An older Eighth Doctor

Nope. Clara specifically said she’d seen all eleven faces of the Doctor. This includes the Eighth Doctor. Clara does not recognise Doctor Hurt so there is no reason to think that he is an older version of the Eighth Doctor.

Doctor Eight-point-five

One of the most popular arguments is that Doctor Hurt is an incarnation of the Doctor between his 7th and 8th regenerations (i.e. between the 8th and 9th Doctors). By his own admission, Doctor Hurt made some rather terrible decisions, and this has led to fan speculation that Doctor Hurt is the Doctor of the Time War.

It would seem that this feels right for many fans, myself included. Doctor Hurt looks burdened and battle-weary. The Time War has been an elusive piece of Doctor Who canon, inserted by Russell T Davies as a way to get rid of the Time Lords. When pitching to the BBC, this was one of the changes made in order to make Doctor Who appeal to modern audiences. The tantilising nature of this off-camera history has bestowed the Doctor with an even greater air of mystery and has created a desire within the fandom to find out more about this part of the Doctor’s past. Delving into the Time War might then be a good tactic of keeping audiences interested in the show.

And yet there is something contradictory about this theory. The Time War is hardly a secret. The Doctor has admitted to essentially committing genocide by putting the entire Time War, Time Lord and Daleks included, into a Time Lock. His actions, and his heart(s)break, has not been something the Doctor has actively hidden. If Doctor Hurt is an incarnation between Eight and Nine, is it possible that he could have done something even worse during the period of the Time War?

Furthermore, there is an important distinction that needs to be made here. When Clara says she has only seen the eleven faces of the Doctor, Eleven makes it clear that he does not consider Doctor Hurt to be “the Doctor”. Eleven considers himself to be the eleventh incarnation of the Doctor and therefore has effectively disowned Doctor Hurt.

This is why I have titled this section “Doctor Eight-point-five”. If this theory is correct, Doctor Hurt does not have a number as the other incarnations do. Which leads me to…

The REAL Ninth Doctor

“What I did, I did without choice – in the name of peace and sanity,” says Doctor Hurt, to which Eleven responds, “But not in the name of the Doctor”.

What isn’t clear is whether Doctor Hurt consciously rejects the name of the Doctor, or whether it is only his future incarnations (presumably Nine, Ten and Eleven) who reject him. And this really is the crux of it.

What makes the Doctor, the Doctor?

Eleven says the name of the Doctor is a promise. Who then, decides whether that promise has been broken? Doctor Hurt believes he had no choice, that his actions were inevitable, if not justifiable. And Eleven is effectively arguing with himself, different personalities notwithstanding. Who has the power to decide whether an incarnation of the Doctor deserves the name? If Doctor Hurt believes himself to be the Doctor, can that right be taken away by a future incarnation? Or is Eleven simply in denial? He certainly has kept this man a secret.

Clara only saw the eleven faces of the Doctor. Why should this be tied in to the name of the Doctor? She entered his time stream and she didn’t see or have anything to do with Doctor Hurt, but he was there. Clara didn’t go and rescue Doctor Hurt from the Great Intelligence. And presumably, the Great Intelligence didn’t, or wasn’t able to, change Doctor Hurt’s history. Yet Doctor Hurt was there in the time stream. I could do my head in trying to work that one out, but I suspect this is some Moffat-y plot hole that cannot really be explained in any way that makes any real sense. Perhaps he was Time Locked by his own actions and somehow managed to propel a future incarnation of himself, Nine, out of the Time War?? Okay, now I’m just grasping…

Despite Eleven rejecting his previous incarnation, and Doctor Hurt being ambiguous about whether he considers himself to be the Doctor, it should be remembered that at the end of the episode, this happened:

Doctor Hurt

Someone thinks Doctor Hurt is the Doctor.

And if Eleven doesn’t really have the power to decide that Doctor Hurt doesn’t count, then that would make Hurt’s character the true Ninth Doctor. This would make Christopher Eccleston the Tenth Doctor, David Tennant the Eleventh Doctor and Matt Smith the Twelfth Doctor. That certainly would send the fandom into meltdown! It would also, as Moffat promised, change Doctor Who forever.

Regardless, this still brings us back to…

Number of Regenerations

As Eleven says, “My real name… that is not the point.”

Indeed it is not.

Doctor Hurt still counts towards the number of regenerations undergone by this Time Lord, irrespective of what he calls himself. That means he has experienced at least eleven regenerations. Now with Matt Smith’s announcement that he is leaving Doctor Who, the next Doctor will be the twelfth regeneration. And according to a large portion of the fan base – the last.

The future of Doctor Who

Will the future of the show come down to profits and ratings?

One could argue quite logically that it has always come down to that. The show was cancelled once before.

We are in a new era. The budget for Doctor Who has increased, thanks in part to Russell T Davies and Julie Gardner who actively fought to keep stories in tact regardless of the budget. The show is geared towards modern audiences and has become more mainstream since it was reintroduced in 2005. The sheer magnitude of the BBC / Doctor Who franchise is what keeps the show running nowadays. Unfortunately the fan base and entertainment value alone will not keep Doctor Who on air. Popular shows still get cancelled when the bottom line doesn’t greatly overshadow the cost of production.

Crunch time will come towards the end of the next Doctor’s reign. I predict that the BBC will be making some very serious decisions in the next couple of years.

Will the BBC finally decide to deal with the Doctor’s regeneration cycle by extending it, or using it is a convenient plot device to bring Doctor Who to a close?

I can only hope that Doctor Who continues for as long as it is good. And I hope that is for a very long time to come.